NXT LEGO® “Exploration.”

In the summer of 2012 I had the privilege of attending The STEM Conference in Cocoa Beach, Florida.  It was during this experience that I worked with many individuals who demonstrated a great knowledge and experience incorporating STEM into the classroom at Kennedy Space Center, NASA.

2012-07-13 17.16.04

Mrs. Karp and Miss Korn working together to program the NXT LEGO®.

One of the seminars that I participated in was a workshop focused on incorporating the NXT LEGO® MINDSTORM.  Initially, I was intimidated and then I played with the NXT with a great STEM group, from Stamford, CT.   Upon the departure of the conference, we were given NXT LEGO® MINDSTORM  to use in our classroom(s).

Working at NASA was only the beginning. Just a month ago I began to build the basic NXT with the help of Mr. Edelson, who teaches Math at Turn of River Middle School.   After gaining some basic knowledge and building the basic robot, I was hooked!   The basic robot that once was turned into “Number 5.”   “Number 5 is alive!”

2013-02-24 19.54.322013-02-24 19.59.01 2013-02-24 20.18.58 2013-02-24 21.16.07 2013-02-24 21.33.44

The exploration of the “Number 5″ has begun and now is the time to begin working to incorporate “Number 5″ into the Science classroom, 201, at Cloonan Middle School.

Preview of What’s To Arrive at Cloonan: West Point STEM

A mission to Mars or a mission to Cloonan! April 2, 2013 West Point will be arriving to Cloonan to share STEM education through Robotics.  The entire school will learn about what West Point can offer future STEM leaders within our Cloonan community.   The Cadets will then work with our STEM Scholars (CFES) to build Robots, program missions, and execute their missions.

http://www.westpoint.edu/cse/SitePages/About.aspx (information below is taken from this link)

About CSE


Mission
The mission of the West Point Center for STEM Education is to design and implement programs that inspire, attract, and develop the STEM talent essential for meeting the Nation’s current and future challenges.
Vision
The West Point Center for STEM Education aspires to be a national leader in enhancing STEM education and inspiring young people to pursue STEM careers.
Goals
The goals of the West Point Center for STEM Education are to:

  • Design, implement, and assess high-quality national, regional, and local outreach projects that:
    • Inform K-12 students about the role of STEM in our world.
    • Inspire K-12 students to pursue STEM careers.
    • Prepare K-12 students’ to study STEM at the college level.
    • Support West Point Admissions through STEM outreach.
  • Facilitate and conduct cadet and faculty research on K-12 and undergraduate STEM education.
  • Develop and maintain strategic partnerships with the Army Educational Outreach Program, the National Defense Education Program, and the National Science Center.
The Need
Many of the world’s greatest challenges involve science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM). Yet there is compelling evidence that the U.S. is falling behind other countries in developing the STEM talent needed to address these challenges—in the workforce, in research, and in academia.
America’s longstanding global leadership in STEM is diminishing. For example, in 1970 the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development found that the U.S had the highest high school graduation rate of 23 nations. By 2007, the U.S. graduation rate of 78 percent ranked 18th of 25 nations. On tests of math and science, U.S. 4th graders generally score well against international competition; however, by the 12th grade, they consistently fall near the bottom or dead last.
Other countries are also surpassing the U.S. in the development of their STEM workforces. In 1985, China granted about the same number of first engineering degrees as the U.S., but granted nearly four times as many in 2005. As a result of this enhanced capacity, China is experiencing an explosion of economic and technological development.
Rising above the Gathering Storm, a report published by the National Academies Committee on Prospering in the Global Economy of the 21st Century, summarizes the problem as follows: “Having reviewed trends in the United States and abroad, the committee is deeply concerned that the scientific and technological building blocks critical to our economic leadership are eroding at a time when many other nations are gathering strength.”
How can we meet this challenge? According to Rising above the Gathering Storm, “This nation must prepare with great urgency to preserve its strategic and economic security. … The United States must compete by optimizing its knowledge-based resources, particularly in science and technology.”
Recognizing the national security implications of this challenge, the U.S. Department of Defense and the U.S. Army are responding to the critical need for improved STEM education. Empowered by Title 10 of the U.S. Code (§ 2192), the National Defense Education Program (NDEP) and the Army Educational Outreach Program (AEOP) have been established to promote the development of the nation’s future STEM workforce. The West Point Center for STEM Education (CSE) is part of this effort.

 

STEM at WestPoint

JSTEM article

WestPoint

Welcome!

 

Hello All!,

Welcome to Miss Korn’s Whacky World of Science blog.  As this is my first time posting, I would like to invite you to interact with this blog as a way to communicate, learn, and explore science education with me.  Lets journey through science, NASA “style.”

Thank you!

Miss Korn